Chalmers on the “difference between Australian and American kids”

Greg Chalmers returned to his home town of Perth and gave us some of his thoughts on the differences between young American and Australian golfers.

Greg Chalmers has a fair bit to play for this week. Currently at number 58 in the world golf rankings, a top-50 spot by the end of the year would see him in the field for all of next year’s majors and WGC tournaments. 
Like the good consistent golfer Chalmers is, he stepped off the plane from Dallas and fired a 4-under 68 to trail current leaders Michael Hendry and Alejandro Canizares by 3 shots. He was ultimately pleased with the round at Lake Karrinyup and admitted he left a few shots out there due to the jet-lag.

“And look, I give myself a break because most of the mistakes I made today, I made a couple soft bogeys just purely out of my brain feeling a little like a mashed potato at some point.” Chalmers said after the round.
Chalmers is one of the more interesting golfers on tourm and he went on to talk a about dealing with an early lead in golf tournaments and his thoughts on the difference between young American and Australian golfers.

“And I think the hardest thing for most people, and it’s something I struggle with in my career is being used to being in that fishbowl; being used to being that guy that everyone is watching to see what you were doing. And until you can get used to that and comfortable with that and in some cases you get a lot of great players thrive on it and really enjoy it; you get to that state, you’ll want it more.” Chalmers said.
“But most kids when they start out, young guys, going out, shooting 6 under, 7 under on the first day and then feel like people are watching and then they find a way to mess that up. That tends to be the case. But a lot of the American kids are the opposite, difference between Australian and American kids. American kids are leading, and watch me go tomorrow; that’s their attitude. Just a difference in attitude.”

One thought on “Chalmers on the “difference between Australian and American kids”

  • October 18, 2012 at 19:19
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    That sounds about right from Chalmers. I would always think the Australian kids are a little bit more laid back and shy and don’t want the spotlight as much.

    Reply

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